Grab More Online Business With Landing Page Videos

by Robert Moskowitz on August 20, 2013
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When done right, videos are an attractive, effective online marketing tool. But do you know how to use them to attract more customers?

Experience shows that adding one or more videos to your landing page (the first page that appears in response to a click, usually a click on a search engine results page or an advertisement) can increase conversion by 80 percent (PDF).

“Videos allow a deeper look into your organization,” explains Carrie Kerpen, CEO of Likeable.com, an award-winning social media and word-of-mouth marketing agency. “Giving potential customers the opportunity to understand who you are and what you do in a simple, shareable format makes it easy for them to spread the word. Videos can also be repurposed on social sites, helping your business index higher in search.”

Here are some tips for making video an integral part of your small business’s website:

Develop Different Types of Videos

Analyze the demographics of your website’s visitors, and which inbound links bring the most traffic to your site. For each broad category of visitor, develop a video that’s likely to resonate with them. For example:

  • Here’s a page from Optimizely that offers a link to see a sales video.
  • Here’s a page from Animoto that displays a video showing how customers use the product.
  • Here’s a page from DollarShave that features an instant-start video of the founder, talking directly to visitors.

Although you may be able to use some of the same images and verbiage in various videos, try to produce as many different clips as there are categories of visitors. Put each video on its own landing page. This way, the first impression you give every visitor to your website generally caters to his or her needs and interests.

Keep Your Videos Under 30 Seconds

Few new visitors to your website will want to watch a lengthy presentation. You need to draw them in and capture their interest first. So, make those first-impression videos no more than 30 seconds long.

Trying to convey too much information, or asking too much from your visitors, will drive prospects away rather than encourage them to click through your site. Be precise in your messaging, offer useful content, and include a reasonable call to action (see below).

Design the Landing Page to Highlight the Video

Design your landing pages around the video you’re presenting. Keep the visual elements simple. You want visitors to zero in on the video immediately, without having to scroll in any direction, and click on it. Use an interesting thumbnail image as the hotlink to the video, and steer clear of auto-play videos, which tend to drive people away from your page.

Add just enough text and graphics to each landing page to prompt visitors to watch the video. A thought-provoking headline (such as “Are you spending more and getting less? Find out here!”) can prompt visitors to linger long enough to watch your video all the way through.

Speak the Prospect’s Language

Craft your videos so that they provide information for visitors who may know nothing beyond the obvious about your product or service. Fill each video with images and language they’re likely to appreciate, and give viewers credit for above-average brain power. Videos that talk down to viewers do more to offend than to attract.

Keep the Video Quality as High as You Can Afford

Work hard to avoid fuzzy images, shaky camera work, muffled sound, and cave-like lighting. Substandard “production values” will prompt your visitors to find something else to watch before they ever receive your message. It doesn’t cost much extra — if anything at all – to shoot videos in high definition and capture high-quality audio.

Low-cost and free software such as Jing, Windows Movie Maker, VirtualDub, WAX, Animoto, or Avedit make it cheap to incorporate sophisticated graphics, too.

When deciding whether or not to spend a little extra on your next video, consider which of these your visitors will appreciate more: Your money-saving video production skills or a captivating, enjoyable video experience. Unless you’re a skilled videographer, it’s usually smarter to trust your business’s increased conversion rate to a professional.

Include a Value Proposition and a Call to Action

Subtlety is important, but find a way to include your business’s unique value proposition and a call to action. Assuming your video grabs and holds people’s interest, they need to know what comes next:

  • Should they call, text, or email you?
  • Do they choose among several product/service options?
  • Can they click on a link to look deeper into your offerings?

Videos not only tend to increase how long people stay on your site, they pump up the trust level, too. By driving home your small business’s value proposition and wrapping it all up with a call to action, you greatly increase the chances that a visitor will become a customer.

Remember: Videos can and probably should be an integral part of your online marketing strategy, one that brings people to your site and makes them buy.

Robert Moskowitz is a business writer for Intuit and is passionate about solving small business problems.

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