How to Market Your Business if You Hate Marketing

by Suzanne Kearns on September 28, 2012
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For some small-business owners, marketing themselves and their work is as painful an experience as a math major having to write an English term paper. But the reality is, if you own a company — and want it to succeed — you have to tell people about it.

Fortunately, you can take several steps to make the process easier, even if you hate marketing.

1. Get over the misconceptions. People have many different ideas about how to go about marketing a business. Whatever path you choose, not understanding which channels to use, how much money to spend, or what type of results to expect can make you uncomfortable. Starting with the facts allows you to put together a plan based on statistics rather than on some vague notion of what you should do. Check out HubSpot’s 20 Revealing Stats, Charts, and Graphs Every Marketer Should Know for the latest data.

2. Figure out what you like to do. There are many forms of marketing, and most people enjoy at least one of them. You can write a blog, engage in social media, create search engine campaigns, develop content for your site, revamp your website for better conversion rates, network in person at events, make phone calls to existing customers, or participate in speaking engagements like webinars, teleseminars, or podcasts. Do the marketing tasks that you like first — and when you see the results, you’ll likely be motivated to explore others.

3. Learn from the experts. Now that you’ve decided where to start, you need the knowledge and tools to do the job right — and get the results you seek. Kutztown University can teach you the basics of marketing for free. Once you feel confident in your abilities, head here for a list of 149 free internet-marketing tools that you can use in your efforts.

Still hate marketing? Outsource the offending tasks to an expert. Elance and oDesk offer contractors with experience. Yes, hiring someone will cost you, but it’ll also help your business survive.

Suzanne has been a full-time freelance writer for 20 years. She’s written for numerous business and financial publications such as Entrepreneur, Reason Magazine, Home Business Magazine, and Money Crashers.

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