In the Trenches: The Neglected Corners of the Business

BrettSnyder by Brett Snyder on February 6, 2013
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I spend so much time focusing on concierge services that I sometimes forget there are other pieces of my business that could use some attention.

Technically, my business is Cranky Flier LLC. The whole concept started with my blog, The Cranky Flier, for which I spend a lot of time writing posts. I absolutely love doing this, and it’s an important marketing tool for building the concierge business.

With my limited time, I focus on writing the posts and not on promoting anything else around them. What do I mean? Well, I have spots for advertising on the blog, and for the most part I just fill them with Google AdSense. Every so often, I get an unsolicited ad buy from someone, but I don’t actively try to sell the space.

Could I be doing better? Yeah, I think so. I mean, I collect a nice bit of change on the ads I do host on the blog. I imagine that if I were to make any real effort to sell ads, I could bring in much more money.

But there are two problems with that: One is that I am so busy tending the concierge business and writing posts that something has to give. I can’t do it all. Two is that I truly hate ad sales — and when I am unable do everything what slips to the bottom? The things I hate doing.

I’m not quite sure how best to address this issue. I mean, I could devote more time to selling ads myself, but then another task has to go away. That doesn’t seem smart. I could also get someone else to sell ads for me, but my site isn’t huge. With my inventory, it’s not a great opportunity for someone looking to earn big money selling ads.

So for now, it continues to be neglected. Any suggestions?

BrettSnyder

Brett Snyder is President and Chief Airline Dork of Cranky Concierge air travel assistance. Snyder previously worked for several airlines, including America West and United, before leaving to create a travel search site for PriceGrabber.com. Snyder did his undergrad at George Washington and earned his MBA from Stanford.

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