Should You Use Facebook for Blog Comments?

Michael Essany Headshot by Michael Essany on February 16, 2012
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As more small-business owners attempt to engage customers online, Facebook plugins are emerging as an attractive option for those who want to drive more traffic to their blogs’ comments section — and increase user engagement, customer loyalty, and revenues.

By integrating Facebook comments into the Comments section of your blog, you greatly increase the odds that people will read and comment on your posts and boost your business’s credibility. The social media plugin is available at no charge for both desktop and mobile websites.

Integrating the user comments from Facebook builds “a level of trust that [you] wouldn’t see otherwise,” online marketing consultant Kristin Longacre tells the Intuit Small Business Blog. “Years ago, people started posting testimonials on their websites. Sometimes they were real, but there were times when companies just made them up. People began to lose trust in those testimonials,” she says. “With Facebook, you know there is generally a real person behind those comments, and it shows that ‘real’ people really do use your product or service.”

Facebook Comments: The Cream of the Crop?

One reason for the popularity of the Facebook comments box plugin is because user comments appear next to the user’s profile picture. Most off-the-shelf blog tools don’t require registration to comment, and the inclusion of photos can be erratic. What’s more, commenting is easy for the user, and moderation is simple for the blog owner. Generally, the volume of spam is significantly lower and the quality of comments is generally higher. For added benefit and exposure, there’s even automated sharing of the blog entry on Facebook.

“If your business is one that has potential customers on social media websites, then having a Facebook mobile plugin is crucial,” Longacre says. “With this plugin you are showing your potential customers that you don’t just rely on a phone system or a website to share deals and information about your business. You are also going to ‘their level,’ as some would say, and interacting on the same network they are. It is less work for them to learn more about your business.”

Prep Before the Plugin

For die-hard blogging enthusiasts in the small-business world, nothing is more disappointing than to see a “no comment posted” message beneath a personally penned masterpiece. But forget the bruised ego: The damage done to a blog’s credibility is worse. The only downside to making a big production out of your comments section is when you don’t have people commenting, Longacre says.

“Make sure that you know people will interact before displaying the Facebook plugin publicly,” she says. “If you’re still building up your Facebook presence, maybe it’s better to hold back a little on adding the plugin to your website.”

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