2017-03-29 00:00:00PayrollEnglishUnderstand how minimum wage law differs for the hunting and fishing industry. Guides have different rates depending on the number of hours...https://quickbooks.intuit.com/ca/resources/ca_qrc/uploads/2017/06/Two-fishing-guides-carry-fish-on-boat.jpghttps://quickbooks.intuit.com/ca/resources/payroll/understanding-labor-laws-hunting-fishing-guides/Accounting Tips: Understanding Labor Laws for Hunting and Fishing Guides

Accounting Tips: Understanding Labor Laws for Hunting and Fishing Guides

1 min read

The Canadian government has slightly different minimum wage requirements for hunting and fishing guides. As of October 2016, the federal government raised the minimum wage across the board, which raised the pay for hunting and fishing guides. It’s important to understand these labour law changes to stay compliant when making your payroll. The seasonal nature of the hunting and fishing industry makes the pay structure for guides unique; weather conditions and customer demand influence how much work guides can get. Employers in this industry don’t pay guides an hourly wage in the traditional sense, but instead pay different rates, depending on the number of hours a day their guides work. So, guides who work five hours a day or less earn a minimum wage of $56.95. If they work five hours a day or more, they earn a minimum wage of $113.95 even if they work a few hours here and there with long breaks in between. You can pay your guides more than the minimum wage, but you can’t pay less. The Canada Revenue Agency understands the challenges facing the hunting and fishing industry and offers business owners and workers some flexibility as a result. Payroll software like QuickBooks can handle the complexities of tax law so you can stay focused on your business.

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Information may be abridged and therefore incomplete. This document/information does not constitute, and should not be considered a substitute for, legal or financial advice. Each financial situation is different, the advice provided is intended to be general. Please contact your financial or legal advisors for information specific to your situation.

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