Cash flow statement

The cash flow statement in QuickBooks can help you better manage your cash flow.

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Cash flow statement

The cash flow statement in QuickBooks can help you better manage your cash flow.

Start my free trial

No credit card required

Always know how much cash is on hand.

Manage your cash flow
In most businesses, revenue does not come in at the same time as costs have to go out, and this is where understanding cash flow is critical. Because QuickBooks tracks and organizes all of your accounting data, it’s easy to access the cash flow statement. In a just a few clicks, QuickBooks generates your cash flow statement to help you evaluate whether there is enough money coming in to pay your bills.

Make better business decisions
Cash is essential for keeping your business financially healthy, so managing your cash flow is critical to your success. QuickBooks makes it easy to generate a cash flow statement to get a clear view of your cash flow over a specified period of time. With QuickBooks, you can see where your money comes from and when, as well as where your money is spent.

Assess your financial health
The cash flow statement is one of the three key financial statements used to assess a company’s financial health. The other two are the balance sheet and the income statement. With QuickBooks, it’s easy to generate the reports and financial statements you need to run your business. The cash flow statement helps you look back over a specific period (typically a quarter) to predict the cash you will need in the future to meet your financial obligations.

Understand the cash flow statement.

Managing cash flow
Cash flow refers to the movement of money into and out of the business. The activities that businesses undertake to control the delay between the time they have to pay their suppliers and the time that they collect cash from customers is called cash flow management. Businesses delay cash payments as long as possible while encouraging anyone who owes money to pay as quickly as possible to control their cash flow.

Cash flow versus profit
Cash flow should not be confused with profit. Profit refers to the difference between revenue and cost over a period of time, whereas cash flow measures your cash on hand. A business may be profitable but still not have the cash needed to pay employees, vendors, or creditors. Businesses need to manage cash flow to ensure that there is enough money coming in to pay the bills today.

Using the cash flow statement
The cash flow statement is crucial in helping you to efficiently run your business. It documents the cash inflows and outflows in your business, which are separated into three categories; operating, investing, and financing. Most of the cash activity in a business takes place in the operating category. The ending cash balance in the statement of cash flows should equal the ending cash balance in the balance sheet.

Understand the cash flow statement.

Managing cash flow
Cash flow refers to the movement of money into and out of the business. The activities that businesses undertake to control the delay between the time they have to pay their suppliers and the time that they collect cash from customers is called cash flow management. Businesses delay cash payments as long as possible while encouraging anyone who owes money to pay as quickly as possible to control their cash flow.

Cash flow versus profit
Cash flow should not be confused with profit. Profit refers to the difference between revenue and cost over a period of time, whereas cash flow measures your cash on hand. A business may be profitable but still not have the cash needed to pay employees, vendors, or creditors. Businesses need to manage cash flow to ensure that there is enough money coming in to pay the bills today.

Using the cash flow statement
The cash flow statement is crucial in helping you to efficiently run your business. It documents the cash inflows and outflows in your business, which are separated into three categories; operating, investing, and financing. Most of the cash activity in a business takes place in the operating category. The ending cash balance in the statement of cash flows should equal the ending cash balance in the balance sheet.

More than cash flow. Run your entire business with QuickBooks.

Track payments
Track payments from your mobile phone or tablet with QuickBooks. Do your clients want to pay you via cash? No problem. It’s easy to accept and record cash payments. Simply enter the cash receipts details into the QuickBooks app and we’ll track the payment in your books for you.

Access accounting reports
Understand how your business is doing through your accounting dashboard, by running your cash flow statement, by reviewing your balance sheet, and more. In a glance you can see your net cash on hand, when bills are due, outstanding invoices, and more.

Track expenses
Connect QuickBooks to your bank account, credit card, Square, and others, and QuickBooks will automatically import, categorize, and track expenses for you. You can quickly review expense reports to see how much money you’re spending on each project or job.

The Cash Flow Statement in QuickBooks

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How To Prepare a Cash Flow Statement

There are the two ways to prepare a statement of cash flows; the direct method and the indirect method. Learn which method to use for your business in order to get a handle on your cash flow.
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Understanding Cash Flow From Financing Activities
Cash flow from financing activities (CFF) conveys a business’ fiscal wellness by evaluating how it raises funds and repays investors. Investors often use CFF to evaluate whether or not a company is a good investment.
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How to Use Cash Flow From Operating Activities to Track Revenue

Cash flow from operating activities (OCF) is the cash version of net income. Because OCF reveals the cash produced by core business operations, some say this metric offers the most realistic view of a company’s long-term fiscal health.
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Frequently Asked Questions