Flexible payments. Easier projects.

Whatever the job, we have just the way to get invoices paid—organized in one place.

  • Online payments

    Online payments

    Add a button to accept credit and debit cards directly through the invoice.**
  • Settle invoices on-site

    Settle invoices on-site

    Take contactless, in-person payments with our mobile app and card reader.**
  • ACH and eChecks

    ACH and eChecks

    Let customers pay digitally, instead of by mail.
  • Schedule in advance

    Schedule in advance

    Set recurring invoices to be automatically sent and paid.

QUICKBOOKS CASH

All-in-one business and banking

It’s not just how you get invoices paid—but where.

Pair Payments with a QuickBooks Cash bank account for Instant Deposit at no added fee (if eligible), and a seamless way to spend, stash, and grow your money from one place.**

QUICKBOOKS CASH

All-in-one business and banking

It’s not just how you get invoices paid—but where.

Pair Payments with a QuickBooks Cash bank account for Instant Deposit at no added fee (if eligible), and a seamless way to spend, stash, and grow your money from one place.**

Personalize invoices to raise your profile

Add logos
Distinguish your business and leave a lasting impression.
Tailor colors
Make sure invoices reflect your professional brand and style.
Preview designs
Know exactly what customers will see, so there are no surprises.
invmob
Personalize invoices to raise your profile
Personalize invoices to raise your profile
Personalize invoices to raise your profile

Simplify every part of getting paid

Take a closer look at how we make invoicing fast and flexible, from start to finish.

Simplify every part of getting paid

Take a closer look at how we make invoicing fast and flexible, from start to finish.

PAINLESS PREP

Auto-filled for painless prep

Don’t sweat the details—we’ll do it for you. Customer info is automatically populated so creating invoices is a cinch.

PAINLESS PREP

Auto-filled for painless prep

Don’t sweat the details—we’ll do it for you. Customer info is automatically populated so creating invoices is a cinch.
digitalPayments

REAL-TIME TRACKING

No runaround, just real-time updates

Track payments on your phone. You’ll get alerts the moment customers view and pay invoices.

REAL-TIME TRACKING

No runaround, just real-time updates

Track payments on your phone. You’ll get alerts the moment customers view and pay invoices.
digitalPayments

FAST DEPOSITS

Deposits that work as fast as you

Have money on hand when you need it. Eligible payments are deposited next business day—or instantly for an extra 1% fee.**

FAST DEPOSITS

Deposits that work as fast as you

Have money on hand when you need it. Eligible payments are deposited next business day—or instantly for an extra 1% fee.**
digitalPayments

AUTOMATIC BOOKKEEPING

Bookkeeping, minus the busywork

When customers pay through QuickBooks Payments, we’ll record and match it for you. Your books stay tax ready, and you stay free to focus.

AUTOMATIC BOOKKEEPING

Bookkeeping, minus the busywork

When customers pay through QuickBooks Payments, we’ll record and match it for you. Your books stay tax ready, and you stay free to focus.
digitalPayments
Square* PayPal*
ACH

An electronic money transfer between banks that pulls money from your customer’s bank account and pushes it to your bank account.

1%

(max $10)

1%

(min $1)

2.9%

+ 30¢

Keyed

Manually typing in a customer’s credit or debit card info. For example, taking payment over the phone.

3.4%

+ 25¢

3.5%

+ 15¢

3.5%

+ 15¢

Invoice

Sharing an online invoice with your customer, who then pays it using a credit or debit card.

2.9%

+ 25¢

2.9%

+ 30¢

2.9%

+ 30¢

Card reader

Card payments processed by insert, tap, or digital wallet with a card reader.

2.4%

+ 25¢

2.6%

+ 10¢

2.7%

*Rates are accurate as of 3/31/2021. Fee comparison excludes PayPal ACH for sending money to friends and family.

Lower rates, more cash in your pocket

Keep more of what you make with our affordable rates. No upfront costs, subscriptions, or hidden fees.

Charge more than $7,500 per month?
Save up to 40% by chatting with us today.

QuickBooks Desktop customer?

See Desktop Payments pricing

PAYMENTS RATES

Lower rates, more cash in your pocket

Keep more of what you make with our affordable rates. No upfront costs, subscriptions, or hidden fees.

Charge more than $7,500 per month?
Save up to 40% by chatting with us today.

QuickBooks Desktop customer?

See Desktop Payments pricing

Square* PayPal*
ACH

An electronic money transfer between banks that pulls money from your customer’s bank account and pushes it to your bank account.

1%

(max $10)

1%

(min $1)

2.9%

+ 30¢

Keyed

Manually typing in a customer’s credit or debit card info. For example, taking payment over the phone.

3.4%

+ 25¢

3.5%

+ 15¢

3.5%

+ 15¢

Invoice

Sharing an online invoice with your customer, who then pays it using a credit or debit card.

2.9%

+ 25¢

2.9%

+ 30¢

2.9%

+ 30¢

Card reader

Card payments processed by insert, tap, or digital wallet with a card reader.

2.4%

+ 25¢

2.6%

+ 10¢

32.7%

*Rates are accurate as of 3/31/2021. Fee comparison excludes PayPal ACH for sending money to friends and family.

The complete guide to creating invoices & getting paid

By Madeleine Somerville June 25, 2020
Whether a freelancer, consultant, or entrepreneur, invoicing is a key component of your business. But what is the easiest and more cost-effective way to create invoices? This guide covers everything you’ll need to craft professional invoices:

How to create invoices

Professional invoices build a cohesive look for your business and brand, as well as highlight the value of the work you’re providing. QuickBooks streamlines the process with automatic prompts to help you fill in the required information. Here are the essential elements you should include in each invoice:
1. Company information
List your contact information and your customers’ details—legal name, business address, phone and fax number (if applicable)—near the top or bottom of the invoice.
2. Header
Include the title, “Invoice,” at the top of your document so customers can immediately identify the communication.
3. Date, invoice number, and unique identifier
Include the invoice issuing date, as well as an invoice number or other unique identifier. This can be a simple file number, unique billing code, or date-based purchase order number.
4. Customer purchase order (PO) numbers or billing codes
Ask your customer about any unique details to include, such as an internal PO number or billing code. For many larger companies, these identifiers are necessary to keep track of payments.
5. Itemized list of goods and services
Your customer—and potentially, an auditor—should understand what goods and services you’ve provided with just a brief scan of the invoice. Include names, dates, rates, the quantity of the goods and services provided, as well as any price modifications, item descriptions, and your work processes.
6. Payment terms
Include a due date and be aware that standard payment terms vary by industry, business, and client relations. Clarify that penalties—late fees or a percentage of the total bill—will be imposed if these terms are not met.
7. Itemized fees
List taxes, handling fees, or other charges, on separate lines. This is important for varying budgets and balancing your internal bookkeeping.
8. Total amount due
Make sure your total amount due is clear and easy to find.
9. Instructions for paying
Provide a clear set of payment steps specifying how you accept payments: online, wire transfer, check, or credit card. The more options you provide, the faster you’ll get paid.

Payment terms on invoices

It’s important to include payment terms and conditions in order to clearly communicate when payment is expected and how customers can pay the invoice.
Invoice Payment TermWhat It Means
Terms of saleThe terms agreed upon by the buyer and seller, such as cost, amount, delivery/shipping, taxes, payment method and payment due date.
PIAPayment in advance. This lets the customer know that the full payment is expected in advance, before starting work.
CIACash in advance. This lets the customer know when you expect the payment (in advance) and how you will accept the payment (in cash).
Immediate paymentThis lets the customer know that the payment is expected at the same time as the product/service is delivered, or the seller has the right to repossess the product/service.
Upon receiptThis tells the customer you expect payment as soon as the customer receives your invoice.
Net 7Payment is due 7 days after the invoice date.
Net 10Payment is due 10 days after the invoice date.
Net 21Payment is due 21 days after the invoice date.
Net 30Payment is due 30 days after the invoice date.
Net 60Payment is due 60 days after the invoice date.
Net 90Payment is due 90 days after the invoice date.
Net EOMPayment is due at the end of the month in which the invoice is received.
15 MFIMFI stands for Month Following Invoice. 15 MFI means payment is due on the 15th of the month following the invoice date.
2/10 Net 30Net 30 means payment is due within 30 days of the invoice date. 2/10 Net 30 means if the customer makes the payment within 10 days, they will receive a 2% discount.
50 Percent upfrontThe customer must pay 50% of the total invoice amount before any work begins.
Line of credit payThis gives the customer the option to settle their invoice over a period of time by purchasing the product/service on credit.
Quotes & estimatesThese are the proposed prices for your products/services.
Recurring invoiceRecurring invoices are used for ongoing services, typically with monthly or quarterly payments.
Interest invoiceAn interest invoice outlines the fees associated with the interest charged based on a past due payment.
Invoice factoringInvoice factoring means you sell your unpaid invoices to a third party (an invoice factoring company) that will purchase the invoices from you for a percentage of their total value and take responsibility for collecting the invoice payments, giving you immediate cash on hand.
Cash accountPayment on a cash account is collected via cash only–no credit.
Letter of creditThis is documented credit confirmed by a bank/financial institution.
Bill of exchangeThis is a promise from the customer to pay at a later date, typically supported by a bank/financial institution.
CODCash on delivery. This means payment is expected at the same time as the delivery of the product/service
CNDCash next delivery. This is used for recurring services, meaning the current delivery of the product/service must be paid for before the next delivery date.
CBSCash before shipment. Payment is expected before the product is shipped
CWOCash with order. Payment is expected at the time the order is placed.
1MDMonthly credit payment of a full month’s supply of goods/services.
2MDMonthly credit payment of a full month’s supply of goods/services, plus an extra calendar month.
ContraThe customer’s payment is offset against the value of supplies purchased from the customer.
Stage paymentPayment made on an agreed amount at that stage (of installments).

Do I need a payment contract?

A payment contract can clarify and solidify a customer’s expectations. You should discuss and come to an agreement on important terms, including:
  • How you charge
  • The range of services you will provide
  • Your payment terms
  • If you charge deposits
Outline parameters for late payments. For example, 10% of the payment late fee for each 10 days a payment is overdue. Go over the contract details with your client before beginning work. Spending five minutes drafting an invoice can avoid costly misunderstandings in the future.

Should I require a deposit?

A deposit of between 30-50% can protect you if client troubles arise. Outline the parameters in your contract, make sure your clients are aware of your policy, and issue an invoice for the deposit amount. When the job is completed, issue a second invoice deducting the deposit amount from the total owed.

How to accept invoice payments

Cash
Cash transactions have no fees, but they cannot be tracked. It is also difficult to securely transfer large sums of money, so cash transactions are rare.
Check
Use a standard checking account as there usually are no transaction fees. However, checks require that you manually update your books and your invoice tracking system.
Automated Clearing House (ACH)
An ACH transaction transfers funds from your customer’s bank account to yours electronically. ACH transfers are fast and secure. Your customers will need to supply their transit and account numbers.
Credit and debit cards
QuickBooks users can accept both credit and debit cards. Transaction fees vary slightly based on the payment platform, but typically range from between 2.4–3.4%.
Do you accept a lot of payments in person? With products like Square and the QuickBooks mobile card reader, you can take credit and debit card payments on the spot. And if you deal in online transactions, PayPal is a great option (and typically has fees of 2.9%). Plus, all integrate seamlessly with QuickBooks software.
BitCoin
Less common than traditional payments, crypto currency transfers are simple for QuickBooks customers—just turn on your PayByCoin feature.

Tracking invoices

If you’re creating your invoices in Word or Excel requires meticulous organization, can leave you open to information loss, and error. QuickBooks’ features take the guesswork out of invoice tracking:
  • Automatically generated invoice numbers
  • Sorting invoices by client name
  • Providing a clear balance sheet of sent invoices
  • Identifying past due invoices
QuickBooks also offers a Pay Now button on the invoice itself, which can help you get paid 2x faster.1

Sending Payment Reminders

Payment requirements are typically set at 30, 45, or 60 days. But a month is a long time and a payment due date may be forgotten. With the payment reminders feature built into QuickBooks, you’ll get the prompts, reminders, and organization you need to make sure invoices don’t fall through the cracks.
Here are a few examples for how to write a payment reminder message for your customers/clients. You can customize them to fit your specific needs and match the relationships with your customers.
Day 15 – Polite reminder email example
“This is a friendly reminder that payment for invoice #0036, in the amount of $1,500 will be due on September 12, 2017. Prompt payment is very much appreciated—please let me know if you have any questions.”
Day 30 – Late payment email example
“This is a friendly reminder that I have not yet received payment for Invoice #0036 in the amount of $1500, due September 12, 2017. Please let me know if you have any questions.”
Day +30 – You may want to call them
Once an invoice is more than 30 days late, picking up the phone and giving them a call is a great way to go. It’s best to assume honest oversight over intentional malice, but it’s ok to let them know that quick payment is appreciated.

The cost of getting paid

With so many payment methods and fees, it’s tempting to stick to good old-fashioned cash and check. But other forms of payment can attract more customers and even get paid up to two times faster. But, is it worth it?
Cost vs. loss comparison
Sam’s latest client, Ms. Ramirez wants to buy a 3,600 square foot house and needs it inspected and tested for radon. After completing the inspection, Sam issues her an invoice for $1,000 (his fixed rate of $0.25 per square foot x 3,600 square feet = $900, plus $100 for radon testing).
Here’s a chart of how much of that $1,000 Sam will end up keeping depending on which type of payment he accepts:
So, is it worth 2-3% of each invoice to offer your clients more payment options, avoid the hassle of depositing checks and manually tracking cash, and get paid up to two weeks sooner? For many business owners, the answer is yes.

When clients don’t pay

Hopefully, you won’t encounter this too often. Since you have a payment contract in place with your client, refer them to the contract parameters. You’ve established a 10% late fee for each 10 days a payment is overdue.
Using invoice factoring is also effective. This is a process whereby a third party buys your invoice debt, typically giving you between 70-90% of its value. When your invoice gets paid, you receive the remaining 10-30% of the invoice, minus the company’s processing fee.
Invoicing is a breeze once you’ve mastered the basics—and with QuickBooks, a well-made invoice personalized for your precise business needs is easily accessible.
Information may be abridged and therefore incomplete. This document/information does not constitute, and should not be considered a substitute for, legal or financial advice. Each financial situation is different, the advice provided is intended to be general. Please contact your financial or legal advisors for information specific to your situation.

Six ways to get your invoices paid on time

By Carrie Smith March 21, 2019
Having trouble getting invoices paid? You’re not alone. Check out these 6 ways to keep the incoming revenue wheels greased, making sure you get paid as quickly as possible.  
1. Accept all forms of payment
The easier it is for your customers to pay, the more likely they are to pay on time.
Checks
Paper checks may seem like a thing of the past, but there are still a valid payment widely in use. And after all, there’s no harm in embracing all your clients’ preferred methods of pay. Make sure you clearly list your company’s name and mailing address or PO box on your invoices so clients know exactly where to send checks.
Credit and debit cards
Credit and debit cards are easy to use and help you get paid on time. Some of the best and most popular merchant credit card processing services include:
  • QuickBooks Payments
    Send email invoices with a Pay Now Button, and make it easy for your customers to pay directly within the invoice. Same rates for all major credit cards (2.9% + $.25 for an invoice paid online).
  • Square
    You can process credit or debit cards in person or digitally. Plus, you can auto-import sales and expenses in QuickBooks using the Sync with Square app.
ACH bank transfers
ACH bank transfers are often the cheapest and easiest way to move money. This is especially helpful for repeat customers. Just setup the account and routing numbers once, then collect 100% of the money you’re owed.
PayPal
It only takes a few minutes to receive PayPal payments. The receiver—i.e. the invoicer—is responsible for the fee of $.30, plus 2.9% on every transaction. These fees can be deducted as a business expense.
Mobile pay
Mobile pay is fast becoming one of the most prevalent payment methods around. These are some of the most popular apps that sync with other payment processing services:
  • Samsung Pay
  • Apple Pay
  • Google Pay
  • Venmo Share Payments
  • Facebook Messenger Payments
Be flexible, look for options that keep your bookkeeping straightforward and don’t forget to write off the transaction fees associated with digital payments.
2. Create clear invoices
Your revenue relies on getting your invoices paid. It’s worth investing time in making them as clear as possible. Here is a brief checklist of invoice necessities and an example of a thorough and easy to understand invoice:
  • Make the total and due date clear
  • Itemize goods and services
  • Send it to the correct person
  • Track and simplify with identifiers
3. Be timely
The quicker you send an invoice, the faster you’ll get paid. Here are some ways to ensure your invoices get out quickly, and into the right hands.
Promptness counts
Send out invoices according to the timeline stated in the contract, or as soon as the project is complete.
Automate invoices
Automated invoicing, one of the most helpful features in QuickBooks, allows you to create an invoice template that can be used over and over again. You can even schedule recurring invoices.
Be persistent
Customers and clients are busy, and a payment reminder is often welcomed. QuickBooks can help here too by setting automated email nudges to remind customers that payment is due.
4. Establish Penalties
A penalty may sound negative, but they are a vital aspect of business. Think of penalties as a way to promote timely payments, not punish your valuable customers.
Here are a few ways to implement penalties for late payment:
Flat late fees
A flat late fee is a specific dollar amount set forth in a contract and implemented after an agreed upon payment date has been exceeded.
Accruing interest
An accruing interest charge compounds every week or month that payment is late. The terms of this percentage should be laid out in your contract or payment policy.
Finance charges
Finance charges cover the gamut of flat fees, a percentage of the invoice amount, accruing interest and any other forms of fees you assess clients for failing to pay. QuickBooks Invoicing has this feature built-in, so you can assess any finance charges to outstanding invoices without a huge hassle.
5. Automate reminders
You’re busy. So automated invoice reminders will save you time and a lot of stress. QuickBooks Invoicing software  also offers this feature.
Automate reminders before and after the due date
Don’t wait until an invoice is 45 or 60 days past the payment date before setting up an automatic payment reminder. Like with the initial invoice, the likelihood of collecting old invoices decreases over time.
Consider auto-collection
To save you time later, consider requiring a credit card number upfront. This way if invoices aren’t paid on time, you can auto-collect past due payments.
6. Incentivize early or n-time payments
Encourage on-time payments by providing incentives for clients. This is a way of offering a thank you to customers who make payment a priority. Offering early payment perks or sending hand-written thank you notes display a customer-centric outlook.
Late and unpaid invoices create a lot friction in small business. But putting a few simple systems like these in place can greatly reduce the time spent chasing customers and get revenue in your bank account more quickly.
Information may be abridged and therefore incomplete. This document/information does not constitute, and should not be considered a substitute for, legal or financial advice. Each financial situation is different, the advice provided is intended to be general. Please contact your financial or legal advisors for information specific to your situation.
**Features
Instant Deposit: Instant deposit is an additional service offered by QuickBooks Payments subject to eligibility criteria, including delayed eligibility for new users and availability for only some transactions. The service carries an extra 1% fee in addition to standard rates for ACH, swiped, invoiced, and keyed card transactions. Deposits are sent to the bank account linked to your QuickBooks Debit Card or another eligible debit card in up to 30 minutes. Deposit times may vary for third party delays..
Free Instant Deposit: Only available for QuickBooks Payments transactions using Instant Deposit that are deposited into a QuickBooks Cash account. Includes use of Instant Deposit without the additional cost. Standard payment processing rates apply for transactions qualifying for Instant Deposit.
Next-day deposit: Next-day deposit features are subject to eligibility criteria. Subscription to QuickBooks Online may be required. We anticipate that a large majority of customers who use bank transfers (ACH) with QuickBooks Payments will receive next day bank transfer (ACH) deposits as transaction history is established. New payments customers will be notified when next day bank transfer (ACH) eligibility is established. For next day deposits, payments processed before 3:00 PM PT arrive at your bank the next business day (excluding weekends and holidays). Deposit times may vary for other payment methods, third party delays or risk reviews.
QuickBooks Card Reader: Data access is subject to cellular/internet provider network availability and occasional downtime due to system and server maintenance. Product registration and QuickBooks Payments account required. Account subject to eligibility criteria, credit and application approval. Terms, conditions, features and services are subject to change. Use is subject to important terms of service and licenses information: quickbooks.intuit.com/payments/legal/
**Product information
QuickBooks Payments account: QuickBooks Payments account subject to eligibility criteria, credit and application approval. Subscription to QuickBooks Online may be required.
QuickBooks Payments and QuickBooks Cash accounts: Users must apply for both QuickBooks Payments and QuickBooks Cash accounts when bundled. QuickBooks Payments’ Merchant Agreement and QuickBooks Cash account’s Deposit Account Agreement apply.
QuickBooks Cash account: Banking services provided by and the QuickBooks Visa® Debit Card is issued by Green Dot Bank, Member FDIC, pursuant to license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. Green Dot Bank also operates under the following registered trade names: GoBank, GO2bank and Bonneville Bank. Registered trade names are used by, and refer to, a single FDIC-insured bank, Green Dot Bank. Deposits under any of these trade names are deposits with Green Dot Bank and are aggregated for deposit insurance coverage up to the allowable limits. Green Dot is a registered trademark of Green Dot Corporation. ©2021 Green Dot Corporation. All rights reserved. QuickBooks products and services, including Instant Deposit, QuickBooks Payments, Cash flow planning / forecasting are not provided by Green Dot Bank.
#Claims
‘Get Paid Twice As Fast’ Disclaimer: ‘Twice as fast’ based on U.S. customers using QuickBooks Online invoice tracking and payment features compared to customers not using these features from Aug 2019 to Jul 2020.
Terms, conditions, pricing, special features, and service and support options subject to change without notice.