Be prepared with workers’ comp

Pay workers’ comp when you run payroll.

Workers compensation for small business

Protect your business with pay-as-you-go workers’ comp insurance

Required in most states,1 workers’ comp is a form of insurance that helps protect you and your employees in case of on-the-job injuries, including medical coverage and wage replacement. It also helps protect employers against potential lawsuits.
  • Set up payroll
    Set up payroll
    Making workers’ comp a part of payroll is just smart business. Start by choosing a payroll solution like QuickBooks Payroll.
  • Learn state requirements
    Learn state requirements
    If you’re not familiar with the workers’ comp laws for your state, use Find my state now to make sure you stay compliant.
  • Get a free quote
    Get a free quote
    Complete this simple form and our broker, AP Intego, will contact you within one business day to discuss your plan options.
  • Pick a policy
    Pick a policy
    AP Intego shops multiple carriers to find the best option for you. And with QuickBooks Payroll, you pay only what’s needed when you run payroll.

Getting started is easy

New or already using QuickBooks payroll?

Automate workers’ comp premiums right from QuickBooks payroll so you never miss a deadline. Fill out this form to receive a quote.
Get a free quote for workers compensation coverage

Looking to switch to QuickBooks Payroll?

Let our trusted broker AP Intego shop multiple carriers to find the best solution for you for free. Call 866-344-4779.
QuickBooks partners with AP Intego to offer free workers compensation quotes

7 reasons to choose the Workers’ Comp Payment Service

  1. Pay as you go, so you can free up valuable cash flow.
  2. Monthly premiums are pay-as-you-go so you can hold onto your money longer.
  3. Hold onto your cash longer by making monthly premium payments with PAYG, instead of paying in one lump sum.
  4. No guesswork or estimates on annual payroll.
  5. Accurate calculations minimize risk of penalties.
  6. Premium payments are automatic, so you’ll never miss a deadline.
  7. We compare options so you get the best value for your business.
Reasons to choose workers compensation payment service

Frequently asked questions

New customers

Current customers

Go beyond workers’ comp and sync with QuickBooks Payroll
Offer terms
1 QuickBooks Workers’ Compensation Payment Service is $5 per month, regardless of how many employees or size of payroll. This non-refundable fee will be automatically added to your invoice from Intuit at the then-current price and will auto-renew until you cancel the service. The fee is separate from any premium charged for the workers’ comp insurance policy by AP Intego Insurance Group. There is no additional charge if you are an Assisted Payroll customer or Full Service Payroll customer. The Workers’ Compensation Payment Service is not available during any trial period of your payroll product, if offered.

Workers’ Compensation Service requires a paid Intuit payroll subscription.

The information on this website is provided to you by Intuit Insurance Services Inc. and AP Intego. All other trademarks and logos used herein are registered trademarks of their respective owners and are used with permission.

Intuit Insurance Services Inc. (IIS) is an authorized broker and is partnered with AP Intego IISI is owned and operated by Intuit Inc and is paid a percentage fee of insurance policy premiums by AP Intego.

Features
* Workers’ comp insurance is required for most businesses with employees, in all states except Texas.

Workers’ compensation: what It Is, who needs it and what’s covered

By Eric Carter September 9, 2019
If one of your employees asked you to describe your workers’ compensation coverage, what would you say?
Many business owners would vaguely describe it as the money that pays for employee injuries that occur while working.
That answer isn’t wrong, but it’s incomplete. Are you familiar with your business’ legal responsibilities under workers’ compensation laws?
This primer on workers’ compensation:
  • Defines workers’ compensation
  • Describes the types of businesses required to carry workers’ compensation coverage
  • Identifies employees covered by workers’ comp
  • Identifies injuries that are, and are not, covered by workers’ comp
  • Describes the benefits available for employees under workers’ comp

What is workers’ compensation?

Workers’ compensation is a benefit for your employees that pays for injuries, and certain injury-related expenses, that occur during or arise out of the employee’s course of work.
Workers’ compensation employee benefits and employer responsibilities are determined by state laws. However, common elements of workers’ compensation rules exist across the various state laws.
A follow-up article will detail state-specific workers’ compensation requirements and resources.

Is your business required to maintain workers’ compensation coverage?

Most states require employers with one or more employees to carry workers’ comp coverage. A few states don’t require coverage until the employer hires a certain number of employees.
For example, South Carolina employers don’t need to carry workers’ compensation coverage until they have four employees.
Texas and South Dakota are currently the only states where workers’ compensation coverage is completely optional.
Depending on your state, you obtain coverage from private insurers, self-insurance, or a state insurance fund. Not all state’s maintain a state insurance fund.

Who does your workers’ compensation coverage cover?

All of your employees are most likely covered by your workers’ compensation coverage. Some exceptions for farming, at-home care and a limited number of part-time employees in certain states exist. However, as a rule of thumb, expect that all of your full-time and part-time employees are covered.
Independent contractors and volunteers are not generally covered by workers’ compensation. There are exceptions to this general rule as well. Certain states cover volunteers under their laws.
For example, Alaska covers volunteer school teachers under its workers’ compensation laws.

What injuries are covered by workers’ compensation?

Most workers’ compensation laws use “compensable injuries,” or a similar term, to describe the injuries covered by workers’ compensation.
In most state statutes, an injury becomes a compensable injury when two elements are both met:
  1. An injury or illness arises out of or in the course of employment, AND
  2. The injury or illness is causally connected to the course of employment
The burden of proof and the standard used to evaluate a causal connection varies depending on the state, but expect a two-pronged test of this type to apply across state laws.
To help explain how this two-step test operates, consider a few examples.
A warehouse fall
Your employee visits your warehouse to retrieve some sample products for an upcoming trade show. The employee climbs a ladder to pull the products from a high shelf. When coming down the ladder, the employee falls and breaks her arm. The break requires surgery and a hospital stay to successfully repair the arm.
First, the employee was clearly acting in the course of employment when the injury occurred. She was physically at your business location performing actions for the benefit of your business.
Note: Her job description and typical duties are irrelevant to the analysis. Whether or not she should have been climbing a ladder plays no role in determining whether or not the fall is covered under workers’ compensation.
Because the employee was injured in the course of her performing work for your business, the first prong of the test is satisfied.
Second, a causal connection between the injury and the course of employment exists. The injury was caused by a fall from a ladder. The employee climbed the ladder to get a product off a shelf. The employee needed the product to prepare for a trade show. Trade show preparation is an act within the course of her employment. There is a clear causal link in this chain of events that led to the injury.
Because a causal link between the injury and employment exists, the second prong of the test is satisfied.
The warehouse fall is a compensable injury because the two elements of a compensable injury are met. Accordingly, your business is required to cover expenses caused by the fall under workers’ compensation.
What is workers compensation, who needs it and what's covered
Your employee is driving home from work. She stops at a stop light, and a delivery truck slams into the back of her car. Your employee suffers a neck injury.
The employee was not injured in the course of her employment. Transportation to and from work is not considered working time, or an action taken in the course of employment.
Accordingly, the first element of a compensable injury is not met, and your business is not required to cover the injury under workers’ compensation.
Subsequent injuries and illnesses
In addition to the initial injury or illness, most states require employers to cover injuries and illnesses that naturally arise from the compensable injury. Examples of naturally arising injuries or illnesses include complications from the injury or exacerbations of existing injuries.
For example, if the employee who fell off the ladder contracts an infection during the hospital stay, the infection will likely be considered a compensable injury under workers’ compensation laws.
Offsite location and work events
Location, where an injury occurs, is less important than the nature of the employee’s conduct when the injury occurs.
For example, if an employee injures herself in a hotel room while on work travel, workers’ compensation covers the injury.
Alternatively, if an employee injures herself in your business’ gym, on her personal time, workers’ compensation will not cover the injury.
Travel for work is considered work in the course of employment. Using company gym facilities is not considered the course of employment. In both instances, location plays no role in the analysis. The employee’s purpose is the key element.
Similarly, work-related entertainment and company events are typically considered work in the course of employment. Holiday parties, offsite company celebrations, and customer dinners are all considered course of employment activities.
Keep this in mind as you plan activities for your employees. If you plan activities that expose employees to the risk of injury, you may be required to cover those injuries under workers’ compensation.
Note: Even if you have your employees sign a waiver before participating in a risky company activity, you will not relieve your company from its workers’ compensation obligations.

Benefits included in workers’ compensation

The injured employee receives payment, and ongoing payments needed to cover all expenses related to the compensable injury. Examples of such expenses include:
  • Medical expenses (doctor visits, hospital bills, labs, x rays, physical therapy, etc.)
  • Wages (if injury prevents work, the employee is entitled to wages during the absence)
  • Lump sum payments (if the injury permanently prevents the employee from working, the employee may be entitled to a lump sum payout)
  • Rehabilitation (if additional rehab is needed for the employee to perform a specific job function, your business may be required to pay for the rehab)
Compensable injuries can be expensive. However, in most instances, workers’ compensation is the exclusive remedy for on the job injuries.
An employee cannot receive payment under workers’ compensation and sue you for another cause of action (e.g. negligence) for the same injury.
To help protect your business from runaway workers’ compensation costs, you typically have the right to require your injured employee undergo a medical examination and prove necessary costs.
Your business will be responsible to pay for the examination, but the examination helps limit your expenses as much as possible.
If you have any employees, you are most likely required to carry workers’ compensation coverage. Visit the website of your state agency that administers workers’ compensation to better understand your responsibilities.
Go beyond workers’ comp and sync with QuickBooks Payroll
Offer terms
1 QuickBooks Workers’ Compensation Payment Service is $5 per month, regardless of how many employees or size of payroll. This non-refundable fee will be automatically added to your invoice from Intuit at the then-current price and will auto-renew until you cancel the service. The fee is separate from any premium charged for the workers’ comp insurance policy by AP Intego Insurance Group. There is no additional charge if you are an Assisted Payroll customer or Full Service Payroll customer. The Workers’ Compensation Payment Service is not available during any trial period of your payroll product, if offered.

Workers’ Compensation Service requires a paid Intuit payroll subscription.

The information on this website is provided to you by Intuit Insurance Services Inc. and AP Intego. All other trademarks and logos used herein are registered trademarks of their respective owners and are used with permission.

Intuit Insurance Services Inc. (IIS) is an authorized broker and is partnered with AP Intego IISI is owned and operated by Intuit Inc and is paid a percentage fee of insurance policy premiums by AP Intego.

Features
* Workers’ comp insurance is required for most businesses with employees, in all states except Texas.

Workers compensation laws by state: Rules, coverage, and benefits

By Eric Carter September 9, 2019
Workers’ compensation is a benefit to your employees that pays for injuries and certain injury-related expenses. Its specifics are determined by state law and vary from state to state.
This article examines state-specific employer obligations, employee benefits, and government resources to assist you with state-specific workers’ compensation details.
Go beyond workers’ comp and sync with QuickBooks Payroll
Offer terms
1 QuickBooks Workers’ Compensation Payment Service is $5 per month, regardless of how many employees or size of payroll. This non-refundable fee will be automatically added to your invoice from Intuit at the then-current price and will auto-renew until you cancel the service. The fee is separate from any premium charged for the workers’ comp insurance policy by AP Intego Insurance Group. There is no additional charge if you are an Assisted Payroll customer or Full Service Payroll customer. The Workers’ Compensation Payment Service is not available during any trial period of your payroll product, if offered.

Workers’ Compensation Service requires a paid Intuit payroll subscription.

The information on this website is provided to you by Intuit Insurance Services Inc. and AP Intego. All other trademarks and logos used herein are registered trademarks of their respective owners and are used with permission.

Intuit Insurance Services Inc. (IIS) is an authorized broker and is partnered with AP Intego IISI is owned and operated by Intuit Inc and is paid a percentage fee of insurance policy premiums by AP Intego.

Features
* Workers’ comp insurance is required for most businesses with employees, in all states except Texas.

See what’s required for your business

Workers’ comp insurance isn’t something you want to put off—especially if it’s required. Each state has unique workers’ comp laws. Take this quiz to get a sense of the requirements that may apply for your business.

Where do your employees work?

Working across state lines

Workers’ comp coverage is regulated by the states and determined by where your employees work, so you’ll need to check the requirements wherever you have employees on the job.

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

What’s your business type?

Business types

Corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies, and sole proprietors are all examples of business entities or types.

  • Sole Proprietorship
  • Partnership
  • Corporation
  • S Corporation
  • Limited Liability Company (LLC)

What’s your payroll headcount?

Worker types

Most states’ requirements vary based on the number of employees, and some include business owners, officers, family members, and 1099 contractors—so include everyone, for now.

  • None
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5 or more
Your results are in

Based on your selections, it looks like workers’ comp coverage may be a state requirement.

Based on your selections, it doesn’t look like you’re required to carry workers’ comp insurance yet, but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Alabama with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Alaska with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Arizona with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Arkansas with no employees, you’re probably exempt from workers’ comp coverage requirements—but it may still be a good idea to get insurance. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in California with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Colorado with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Connecticut with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Delaware with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in the District of Columbia with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Florida with no employees, you’re exempt from workers’ comp insurance requirements but insurance may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Georgia, you’re considered an employer and therefore exempt from workers’ comp requirements, but you can choose to be covered as an employee, which may be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Hawaii with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Idaho with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Illinois with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Indiana with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Iowa with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Kansas with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Kentucky with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Louisiana with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Maine with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Maryland with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Massachusetts with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Michigan with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Minnesota with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Mississippi, you don’t count toward the employee total and can choose not to cover yourself, but insurance might still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Missouri with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Montana with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Nebraska with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Nevada with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in New Hampshire with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in New Jersey with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in New Mexico with no employees, you’re typically not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in New York with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in North Carolina with no employees, you’re not automatically counted as an employee. You can choose to purchase workers’ comp insurance, which may be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in North Dakota with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Ohio with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Oklahoma with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Oregon with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Pennsylvania with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Rhode Island with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in South Carolina with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in South Dakota with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Tennessee with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Texas with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance, and you’re included under state coverage but can choose to opt out. A workers’ comp insurance policy may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Utah with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Vermont with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Virginia with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Washington with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in West Virginia with no employees, you’re included in workers’ comp coverage requirements but can choose to be excluded. Learn why a workers’ comp policy may be a good idea

As a sole proprietor in Wisconsin with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

As a sole proprietor in Wyoming with no employees, you’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance—but it may still be a good idea. Learn why

These workers’ comp details apply in the state you selected:

In Alabama, most businesses with 5 or more regular employees (including business officers and members) must have workers’ comp coverage, unless your workers are household employees or farm laborers.

Exception: Businesses involved in the construction of new single-family residential homes (or providing on-site assistance for this type of construction) are required to have coverage for all employees.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

Employers with 1 or more employees must have workers’ compensation insurance in Alaska.

Exceptions:

  • Executive officers in a for-profit corporation can choose to exclude themselves from coverage.
  • Sole proprietors, partners, executive officers in a nonprofit corporation, members in a member-managed LLC, part-time babysitters, non-commercial cleaners, harvest help, and similar part-time or transient workers, sports officials for amateur events, contract entertainers, commercial fishers, and taxi drivers paid under contract are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Arizona, any business (including sole proprietors) that regularly hires or employs at least 1 employee—regardless of the number or type of workers—is required to carry workers’ comp insurance. This includes all workers who are part-time, full-time, minors, aliens, or family members.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors can choose to opt out of coverage if they don’t have employees.
  • Coverage isn’t required for working partners, independent contractors, casual workers, or domestic servants working in your home.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Arkansas, most businesses with 3 or more regular employees are required to carry workers’ comp insurance. Employers with fewer than three employees should always check with the state authority before assuming they’re not required to carry workers’ comp insurance.

Exceptions: Employers with two or fewer employees, farm laborers, and real estate agents are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In California, all employers and work situations (even those with just one employee) must carry workers’ comp coverage. This includes corporate officers and directors. If you’re an out-of-state employer, you may need coverage for any employees regularly working in California, or if you enter into a contract of employment.

Exceptions:

Executive officers and directors of corporations can be excluded if they own 10% of the outstanding stock. If the directors and officers fully own the corporation, they can choose to be excluded from coverage.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Colorado, all businesses with 1 or more employees are required to carry workers’ comp insurance. Anyone hired to perform services for pay is considered an employee, whether full or part-time.

Exceptions:

  • Exemptions include casual maintenance or repair work for a business for less than $2,000 per calendar year, private domestic and maintenance or repair workers not working full-time, real estate agents and brokers paid by commission, independent contractors with no employees, and drivers working with a contract carrier.
  • A corporate officer of a corporation or a member of an LLC may choose to exclude themselves from coverage.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Connecticut, all businesses with 1 or more employees—whether full-time, part-time, or contract—are required to carry workers’ comp coverage, including uninsured subcontractors.

Exceptions:

  • You’re not required to carry coverage for those employees who are able to self-insure.
  • Corporate officers and members of multi-member LLCs are automatically included but can choose to opt out.
  • Single-member LLCs are not required to carry worker’s comp coverage but may purchase it.
  • Partnerships must provide coverage for employees but don’t have to cover themselves.
  • Employers or workers who work in or around a private home for 26 hours or less per week are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Delaware, businesses with one or more employees are required to carry workers’ comp insurance.

Exceptions:

  • Farm workers are exempt but employers can choose to provide coverage.
  • Workers considered to be independent contractors and not employees are also exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In the District of Columbia, businesses with 1 or more employees are required to carry workers’ comp insurance. Additionally, homeowners are required to provide coverage for domestic workers if 1 or more works at least 240 hours in a calendar quarter in the same or a previous year.

Exceptions: Sole proprietors without employees are not required to carry coverage.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Florida, workers’ comp coverage requirements vary by industry and headcount:

  • Construction businesses with 1 or more employees and non-construction industry employees with 4 or more employees (full or part-time, including corporate officers and LLC members) must carry workers’ comp insurance.
  • Agricultural businesses with 6 or more regular employees and (or) 12 or more seasonal employees who work for more than 30 days are required to carry coverage.
  • Sub-contractors are responsible for providing coverage for their workers but primary contractors are responsible for ensuring that the sub-contractor has worker’s comp insurance.
  • Out-of-state employers must immediately notify their carrier that they have employees working in Florida, carry a Florida workers’ comp policy, or have the out-of-state policy include Florida.

Exceptions:

  • Corporate officers are considered employees unless they choose to exempt themselves from coverage.
  • Sole proprietors and partners in the non-construction industry are not considered to be employees unless they choose to be.
  • Members of an LLC will be considered as corporate officers and employees unless they choose to be exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Georgia, businesses with 3 or more employees are required to carry workers’ comp coverage. This includes individuals, firms, associations, and corporations. Exempted officers of corporations and family members of LLCs are counted as employees. Contractors who subcontract any part of their work may be liable for coverage for the subcontractor’s employees if the subcontractor does not have coverage.

Exceptions: Georgia considers sole proprietors and partners to be employers and not employees, so they are exempt from workers’ comp coverage requirements.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Hawaii, any business with 1 or more employees must carry workers’ comp coverage. This includes full and part-time, permanent, and temporary workers. LLC members must also be covered. Employers can choose to cover any excluded employees.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors and partners are exempt but can choose to cover themselves.
  • Domestic workers earning less than $225 per calendar quarter are exempt.
  • Some 25% stockholders and all 50% stockholders, and real estate salespeople who are paid on commission are all exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Idaho, businesses with 1 or more full or part-time, seasonal, or occasional employees are required to have worker’s comp insurance.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors are exempt but can choose to cover themselves.
  • Household and domestic workers, and sole proprietors who employ family members that live in their household are exempt. Certain family member employees of a sole proprietor employer who don’t live in the same household as the employer can also be exempt.
  • Pilots of agricultural planes, real estate salespeople paid by commission, and casual employees whose work occurs occasionally or at irregular times (and whose work is not related to the type of business conducted by the employer) are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Illinois, workers’ comp coverage is required in nearly every work situation and for every employer—even those with one part-time employee. Coverage is required for employees who are family members unless they qualify for an exemption. If your business is in construction, trucking at a construction site, or other hazardous fields, you’re required to obtain insurance in almost every instance.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors with no employees are exempt but may choose to purchase insurance themselves.
  • Employees who are family members and also corporate officers are exempt.
  • Employees who are immediate family members who also live with the employer are exempt.
  • Employees working for an agricultural business employing less than 4 days of labor per year are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Indiana, all employees must be covered by workers’ comp insurance.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and LLC members are exempt from workers’ comp insurance requirements but can choose to be covered.
  • Corporate officers can choose to be exempt.
  • Independent contractors’ injuries are not covered by workers’ compensation, and independent contractors in the building and construction trades must be certified with the Indiana Worker’s Compensation Board.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Iowa, most businesses are required to purchase workers’ comp insurance.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors and LLC members are not required to be covered but may choose to cover themselves.
  • Exempt and non-covered employees include:
    • Domestic and casual workers who make under $1,500 from their employer during the 12 consecutive months before injury
    • Agricultural workers whose employer has a cash payroll of less than $2,500 in the calendar year before the injury
    • Agricultural exchange labor
    • Officers of a family farm corporation (including spouse, parents, brothers, sisters, children, stepchildren, and spouses of those family members)

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Kansas, workers’ comp coverage is mandatory for all businesses with employees (including executive officers) and over $20,000 gross payroll (paid in Kansas or elsewhere). There are some exceptions, and sole proprietors’ and partnership wages paid to owners and owners’ family members are not counted toward the total payroll. Additionally, family members that are not true owners of a company or do not own 10% of the business must be included in the coverage and cannot choose to be excluded.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and LLC members are exempt but can choose to be included.
  • Agricultural employers and those with an annual gross payroll under $20,000 are exempt.
  • Independent contractors with no employees may choose to be exempt from carrying insurance, but those with employees and a payroll exceeding $20,000 in total gross payroll must provide coverage.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Kentucky, all businesses with 1 or more employees are required to carry workers’ comp coverage, regardless of employee type.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and LLC members are excluded from coverage but can choose to cover themselves.
  • Farm workers and domestic servants in a home with fewer than 2 full-time employees are exempt.
  • Employees protected by federal laws (such as railroad and maritime workers) are exempt.
  • Independent contractors aren’t covered unless they have their own policy.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Louisiana, all businesses must carry workers comp coverage for all full-time, part-time, and contract employees.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, corporate officers, and LLC members are included but can choose to be excluded from coverage.
  • Exemptions include dusting and spraying airplane crews, real estate brokers and agents, musicians and performers, employees covered federally, unpaid officers and board members of certain nonprofit organizations, and people whose work includes the exploration, development, production, or transportation of minerals.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Maine, any business with 1 or more employees must carry workers’ comp insurance. Independent contractors don’t count as employees, but if contractors employ subcontractors, subcontractors must be covered.

Exceptions:

  • Employers of domestic servants, employers of casual or seasonal laborers in agriculture and aquaculture businesses (but they must have $25,000 in liability insurance and $5,000 in medical payments coverage) are exempt.
  • Employers of 6 or less agriculture and (or) aquaculture employees (but they must have $100,000 in liability insurance for each full-time equivalent employee, and at least $5,000 in medical payments coverage) are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Maryland, every business with 1 or more employees must carry workers’ comp coverage, with a few exceptions.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors are excluded from requiring mandatory coverage but can choose to include themselves in their policy.
  • Agricultural employers with less than 3 full-time employees or an annual payroll for full-time employers below $15,000 are exempt.
  • Agricultural office workers, independent contractors on farms (other than migrant laborers), and owner-operators of large tractor-trailer vehicles are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Massachusetts, all businesses must carry workers’ comp insurance, including owners who are considered employees, regardless of the number of hours worked. Employees in domestic service must be covered if they work 16 or more hours per week.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and LLC members are not required to carry coverage for themselves but may choose to be covered under their policy.
  • Workers engaged in interstate and international commerce, salespeople working in real estate or consumer goods paid by commission, taxi drivers who lease their cabs on a fee basis not related to fares (and who are not employees under federal tax law), and people working in interstate or international commerce who are covered by federal law for compensation for injury or death are exempt.
  • Employees in domestic service working less than 16 hours per week are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Michigan, all businesses with 1 or more employees are required to have workers’ comp insurance. Businesses with 3 or more employees at any one time, or employing 1 or more workers for 35 or more hours per week for 13 or more weeks during the preceding 52 weeks are also required to have workers’ comp insurance.

Exceptions:

  • Employees of a sole proprietorship are covered by the Workers Disability Compensation Act, but the sole proprietor (the business owner) is self-employed and not considered to be an employee, and therefore not covered.
  • Under certain circumstances, named partners and corporate officers who are also shareholders of small, closely-held corporations may exempt themselves from coverage.
  • Certain family members of an employer may also be exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Minnesota, all businesses are required to provide workers’ comp insurance coverage to all employees, including non-US citizens and minors.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, some managers of LLCs, officers of closely held corporations, and certain relatives are excluded from compulsory coverage but may choose to be included in their policy.
  • Employers covered by federal liability laws are exempt.
  • Family farm operations are exempt, with some restrictions.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Mississippi, all businesses with 5 regular employees must provide workers’ comp coverage.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and corporate officers don’t count toward the employee total if they choose not to cover themselves.
  • Employers with less than 5 employees or domestic or farm laborers are not required to have coverage but may choose to provide it.
  • Independent contractors are usually excluded from coverage, but protection is given to employees of subcontractors.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Missouri, businesses with 5 or more employees must carry workers’ comp insurance. All construction businesses with 1 or more part-time, full-time, temporary, and seasonal employees are required to provide coverage. Corporate officers count toward the employee total.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors and partners are excluded from requiring coverage but can choose to be covered.
  • Close family member-employees and members of LLCs are covered unless they opt out.
  • Farm laborers, domestic servants, real estate salespeople, and commercial motor-carrier owner-operators are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Montana, all businesses must carry workers’ comp insurance for all employees. Businesses in the construction industry must provide coverage for all employees (both resident and nonresident) if and while they work in Montana.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors can exclude themselves from coverage but may choose to be included.
  • Contractors don’t have to be covered under a business’ workers’ comp policy but must provide proof that they are a certified independent contractor (without proof, your business might be held responsible for their injuries).
  • Domestic and household workers, casual and infrequent employees, freelancers, newspaper carriers, licensed barbers or cosmetologists who contract with cosmetology establishments, petroleum land professionals, and real estate, securities, and insurance salespersons paid on commission are all exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Nebraska, all businesses (including contractors) with 1 or more employees (including part-time employees and minors) must have workers’ comp insurance.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors with no employees are not required to carry coverage but may choose to purchase it.
  • Federal employees, railroad employees, most volunteers, and independent contractors are exempt.
  • Household and domestic servants and some employees of agricultural operations are exempt unless the business chooses to provide coverage.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Nevada, all businesses with at least 1 employee must have workers’ comp insurance. Subcontractors, independent contractors, and their employees must also be covered (unless they’re independent enterprises). Construction businesses are also required to have workers’ comp insurance.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors without employees aren’t required to carry coverage but can choose to carry coverage for themselves.
  • Household and domestic workers and agricultural or horticultural laborers are exempt.
  • Employment related to interstate commerce entities not subject to Nevada’s laws, and employment covered by private disability and death benefit plans are exempt.
  • Employees working in Nevada temporarily and insured in another state (not including construction) are exempt.
  • Casual employees lasting less than 20 days with a labor cost of under $500 are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In New Hampshire, all businesses with any employees (full and part-time, and family members) must carry workers’ comp insurance—even non-profit organizations.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and self-employed individuals are not required to carry coverage for themselves but may choose to carry coverage.
  • Businesses that use subcontractors must ensure they have coverage, or they can be held liable for any injuries to the subcontractor’s employees.
  • Coverage is not mandatory but is optional for corporations or LLCs with 3 or fewer executive officers or members and no other employees (workers’ comp must be obtained once there is a fourth officer or member, though).

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In New Jersey, any businesses with 1 or more employees and any employer not covered by federal programs must carry workers’ comp insurance. This means all corporations are required to carry workers’ comp insurance, even if the only employee is the owner-officer (if the entity is an LLC and the only employee is the owner and managing member, coverage is optional). Out-of-state employers might need coverage if they enter a contract of employment in New Jersey or if any work is performed in New Jersey.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors with no employees are not required to carry coverage but may choose to cover themselves.
  • LLCs in which the only employee is the owner and managing member are not required to have coverage.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In New Mexico, all businesses with 3 or more employees are required to have workers’ comp insurance. Coverage may be purchased voluntarily if the business has fewer than 3 employees. Construction businesses must carry coverage regardless of their number of employees.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors are usually exempt from coverage requirements but may choose to cover themselves.
  • Coverage is not required for domestic servants, real estate salespeople, or farm and ranch laborers.
  • Executives or sole proprietors with a financial interest who are employed by a corporation or LLC can choose not to be covered, but the executive is still counted for determining the number of workers.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In New York, virtually every employer is required to provide workers’ comp coverage for all employees, including family members, part and full-time workers, and leased employees.

Exceptions: Coverage isn’t required for sole proprietors or partners without employees, but they can purchase it for themselves.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In North Carolina, all employers with 3 or more employees are required to carry workers’ comp insurance for all employees (including minors and undocumented workers). Any business in which 1 or more employees’ work involves the use or presence of radiation must have workers’ comp insurance.

Exceptions:

  • Employers with less than 3 employees are exempt.
  • Corporate officers may choose to be excluded from insurance coverage but are still counted in the employee count.
  • Sole proprietors, LLC members, and partners are not automatically counted as an employee and may choose to be included.
  • Agricultural employees are not required to carry workers’ comp unless they have 10 or more non-seasonal agricultural workers.
  • Domestic and household servants are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In North Dakota, all businesses must have workers’ comp insurance for all employees (including part-time, full-time, or seasonal workers) before hiring. The only workers’ comp insurance available in North Dakota is through the state-administered fund. Self-insurance and private insurance are not permitted.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and corporate officers have the option to cover themselves but can choose not to do so.
  • Farm and ranch laborers, household and domestic workers, verified independent contractors, and children (under age 22) of the employer are exempt.

While our insurance experts won’t be able to work up a quote tailored to your business, they are able to help answer questions you may have about workers’ comp in North Dakota.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Ohio, all employers with 1 or more employees must carry workers’ comp insurance. The only workers’ comp insurance available in Ohio is through the state-administered fund. Self-insurance and private insurance are not permitted.

Exceptions: Coverage is optional for sole proprietors, partners, family farm corporate officers, LLCs acting as partnerships, LLCs acting as sole proprietors, and individuals incorporated as a corporation with no employees.

While our insurance experts won’t be able to work up a quote tailored to your business, they are able to help answer questions you may have about workers’ comp in Ohio.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Oklahoma, all employers must carry workers’ compensation insurance—even those with only one part-time employee.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, LLCs, partners, and corporate officers can choose to cover themselves or be excluded.
  • Employers with 5 or fewer total employees who are all related by blood or marriage to the employer are exempt.
  • Some workers in agricultural and horticultural businesses are exempt.
  • Licensed real estate brokers and most household and domestic workers are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Oregon, businesses with 1 or more employees must carry workers’ comp insurance.

Exception: Sole proprietors can purchase coverage for themselves but are not required to do so.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Pennsylvania, workers’ comp insurance is mandatory for all businesses with 1 or more employees, regardless of employee status, number of hours worked per week, or whether the employee is a spouse or a child.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and corporate officers are not required to have coverage but may opt to do so.
  • Licensed real estate salespeople or brokers, licensed insurance agents who work on a commission-only basis, domestic or casual laborers, outworkers, farmers with 1 employee who works less than 30 days a year or earns less than $1,200 a year, and a spouse or child of the farmer-employer under 18 years of age are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Rhode Island, businesses with 1 or more employees must carry workers comp coverage.

Exceptions: Sole proprietors, partners, and independent contractors are exempt. Some real estate, agricultural, and domestic or household employees may also be exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In South Carolina, businesses with 4 or more regular full-time or part-time employees are required to carry workers’ comp insurance. Employees include adults, minors, and seasonal workers.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and LLC members aren’t automatically included in coverage but may choose to include themselves in their policy.
  • Agricultural employees, railroad and railway companies and their employees, and employers with a total annual payroll during the previous year below $3,000 regardless of the number of employees are exempt.
  • Textile hall corporations and some commission-paid real estate salespeople are exempt.
  • If a subcontractor lacks coverage, their injured employees would be covered under the employer’s workers’ comp policy.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In South Dakota, all employers must carry workers’ comp insurance, regardless of the number of employees.

Exceptions:

  • Corporate officers and members of LLCs are included but may choose to be excluded.
  • Sole proprietors and partners are excluded but may choose to be included.
  • Domestic servants working under 20 hours per week and less than 6 weeks in any 13-week period are exempt.
  • Farm and agricultural laborers, independent contractors, real estate agents, and owner-operators of trucks certified as independent contractors are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Tennessee, every employer in the construction or coal mining industry or trade (regardless of the number of employees, including subcontractors), and every employer with 5 or more employees must carry workers’ comp insurance. Family members and part-time employees are included when determining the number of employees. Corporate officers are also included in the count, even if excluded from coverage.

Exceptions:

  • Corporate officers may exclude themselves from coverage but are still included in the employee count.
  • Sole proprietors, LLC members, and partners are excluded but may choose to be included.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Texas, workers’ comp insurance is optional for businesses, but construction companies on contract for governmental entities are required to have coverage. Sole proprietors, partners, corporate officers, and LLC members are included under state coverage but can choose to opt out.

Employers not carrying insurance are non-subscribers and must notify employees, but could be liable in a civil suit. Workers have the legal right to file compensation claims if they think they have a genuine case, and their employer refuses to pay benefits.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Utah, all businesses are required to carry workers’ comp insurance for employees. Directors, officers, and LLC members are considered employees. To exclude themselves from mandatory coverage, they must do so through an insurance company. General contractors must ensure their subcontractors (including sole proprietors, partners, and corporate officers) carry coverage.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and LLCs are not required to have coverage but may choose to be covered.
  • Businesses excluded from mandatory coverage include employers of agricultural laborers, casual or domestic workers, and real estate brokers.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Vermont, all businesses with 1 or more full-time or part-time employees must carry workers’ comp insurance.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors and partners may purchase coverage, but are not required to do so.
  • Corporate officers and LLC members are included in coverage requirements but may choose to be exempt.
  • Businesses that work with independent contractors must determine in writing who’s responsible for insurance If the independent contractor lacks coverage, your business will be responsible.
  • Casual employees whose work is not for the purpose of the employer’s trade or business, and employees in agriculture and farming for an employer whose payroll is less than $10,000 in a calendar year are exempt.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Virginia, businesses that regularly employ 3 or more employees are required to carry coverage. Employees include part-time, seasonal and temporary workers, minors, trainees, immigrants, and working family members. Coverage is optional for businesses with less than 3 employees.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, and LLC members are excluded from mandatory coverage but may choose to cover themselves.
  • Independent contractors are not automatically eligible for workers’ comp coverage, but if the independent contractor employs 2 or more full or part-time employees, those workers are eligible.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Washington, all businesses with 1 or more employees must carry workers’ comp coverage.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors, partners, corporate officers, and LLC members are excluded from mandatory coverage but may choose to be included in their policy.
  • Domestic servants are exempt unless 2 or more are employed regularly for over 40 hours a week.
  • Private residential gardeners and maintenance and repair workers, family farm laborers who are minors, musicians and entertainers at specific events, and cosmetologists and barbers who rent or lease their space are exempt.

While our insurance experts won’t be able to work up a quote tailored to your business, they are able to help answer questions you may have about workers’ comp in Washington.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In West Virginia, all businesses must carry coverage, with some exceptions.

Exceptions:

  • Independent contractors, agricultural employers with less than 5 employees, and casual employers with less than 3 workers are exempt.
  • Sole proprietors, partners, LLC members, and corporate officers are all included in coverage but can choose to be excluded.
  • Domestic service employers, federally-covered employees, employers who are churches, and employers in organized professional sports are exempt, but coverage must be provided for employees who help run the business but do not participate in sporting activities.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Wisconsin, businesses with 3 or more full or part-time employees must carry coverage. Here are a few specifics:

  • Sole proprietors, LLC members, and partners do not count toward the number of employees a business has, but corporate officers do unless there are only 2 of them and the company has no other employees.
  • Farmers who employ 6 or more workers on the same day for any 20 days during the calendar year must purchase insurance no later than 10 days after the 20th day of employment.
  • Out-of-state employers who have employees working in Wisconsin must have coverage, and the policy must be through an insurance company licensed in Wisconsin.
  • Employers with one or more full or part-time employees that have been paid combined gross wages of $500 or more in any calendar quarter for work done at one or more locations in Wisconsin must have insurance by the 10th day of the first month of the next calendar quarter.

Exceptions:

  • Employers with fewer than 3 employees are exempt.
  • Sole proprietors with no employees are not required to carry coverage but may choose to cover themselves.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

In Wyoming, all business must have coverage for all employees. Employees include workers under any contract of hire (express or implied, oral, or written) and also include minors, aliens authorized to work, and aliens the employer reasonably believes to be authorized to work.

Exceptions:

  • Sole proprietors and partners are excluded from coverage for themselves.
  • Corporate officers and LLC members may choose to be covered.
  • Casual laborers, independent contractors, spouses and dependents of an employer living in the employer’s household, individual child caregivers or babysitters whose wages are subsidized and paid by Wyoming’s department of family services, and private household and domestic employees, among others, are not considered employees and are exempt.

While our insurance experts won’t be able to work up a quote tailored to your business, they are able to help answer questions you may have about workers’ comp in Wyoming.

Call an AP Intego insurance expert at 866-344-4779
M-F, 8 AM – 8 PM, ET.

Go beyond workers’ comp and sync with QuickBooks Payroll
Offer terms
1 QuickBooks Workers’ Compensation Payment Service is $5 per month, regardless of how many employees or size of payroll. This non-refundable fee will be automatically added to your invoice from Intuit at the then-current price and will auto-renew until you cancel the service. The fee is separate from any premium charged for the workers’ comp insurance policy by AP Intego Insurance Group. There is no additional charge if you are an Assisted Payroll customer or Full Service Payroll customer. The Workers’ Compensation Payment Service is not available during any trial period of your payroll product, if offered.

Workers’ Compensation Service requires a paid Intuit payroll subscription.

The information on this website is provided to you by Intuit Insurance Services Inc. and AP Intego. All other trademarks and logos used herein are registered trademarks of their respective owners and are used with permission.

Intuit Insurance Services Inc. (IIS) is an authorized broker and is partnered with AP Intego IISI is owned and operated by Intuit Inc and is paid a percentage fee of insurance policy premiums by AP Intego.

Features
* Workers’ comp insurance is required for most businesses with employees, in all states except Texas.

Workers’ comp coverage can help businesses survive the unexpected

By Casey Brooks September 5, 2019
Most states require workers’ compensation coverage, but there are a few exemptions. If your business isn’t required to have workers’ comp insurance, it may still be a good idea to carry an optional workers’ comp policy—read on to learn why.

Why workers’ comp insurance can be a big deal

Workers’ comp insurance protects employees if they get injured on the job, and protects businesses if employees file lawsuits pertaining to on-the-job injuries. Basically, medical bills, lost wages and legal expenses associated with on-the-job injuries are likely to be covered by workers’ comp.
Whether or not a business needs workers’ comp is determined on a state level by several factors, including how many employees there are and where they work, the business type—and sometimes, the industry. Most state workers’ comp laws require businesses with even a single employee on the payroll carry workers’ comp insurance, but sole proprietors with no employees are not required to have coverage. In a few states, the requirement for workers’ comp doesn’t kick in until there are a few more employees on the payroll.

Who needs workers’ comp insurance?

For those self-employed business owners that are not required by their state to carry workers’ comp insurance, an optional policy may feel like an unnecessary expense—but businesses can benefit from coverage even when it isn’t required:
  • Independent contractors working with other businesses

    Some businesses require contractors working for their company to carry independent contractor workers’ compensation insurance, so they can limit their own company’s liability.
  • Self-employed business owners

    Most health insurance policies won’t cover work-related illnesses and injuries, but workers’ comp policies are designed to help cover medical bills and lost wages.
  • Businesses that operate in high-risk industries

    Businesses in industries related to construction1 ​and transportation2​ ​face more frequent injury and can purchase optional coverage so they won’t have to pay all work-related injury medical expenses out of pocket.

Operating without coverage can be risky business

Without workers’ comp coverage, how would your business handle the financial fall-out from a worksite accident which injured a worker? Would your business be able to handle the financial impact of a lawsuit filed by a worker who was seriously injured on the job? What if an employee lost a limb, became permanently disabled, or died from their job-related injuries?
Medical treatment and rehabilitation are often needed before injured employees can return to work. This can mean lost wages and large medical bills for the injured worker—a devastating combination for all parties involved.
Most businesses aren’t able to cover these kinds of expenses with their available cash flow, and those businesses facing workers’ comp claims without coverage may be liable for costs associated with the claim—regardless of state workers’ compensation coverage requirements—including medical treatment, rehabilitation, lost wages, and liability insurance for the business, should an injured employee file a lawsuit.
When comparing the cost of having a workers’ comp policy to the potential out-of-pocket costs of caring for a seriously injured worker, choosing to cover employees even if it’s not required starts to sound like a smart business move.

The cost of needing coverage vs. the cost of having it

Every 7 seconds, a worker is injured on the job in the U.S.3​ ​The average cost for a workers’ comp medically consulted injury claim nationwide and across industries is over $30,000 (and over $1M for a work-related death)4​ ​, while the national median cost of coverage per worker is $1.70 per $100 of payroll​.5
The employer costs for workers’ comp insurance can depend on several factors, including industry and location. For example, coverage for a construction worker in New York or California can cost quite a bit more than coverage for a worker in the same industry in North Dakota.6​
One thing that can affect many businesses equally is coming up with large lump sum premiums to purchase workers’ comp coverage, which can put a strain on their cash flow. A​ ​Pay As You Go​ ​workers’ comp policy is a popular alternative to annual lump-sum premium plans.
If you’re a business owner looking at workers’ comp options, make sure to talk to an insurance expert. The insurance experts at AP Intego are available to answer any questions you have and are happy to work up a free quote for you.
Go beyond workers’ comp and sync with QuickBooks Payroll
1 OSHA Commonly Used Statistics, published online at https://www.osha.gov/oshstats/commonstats.html

“Out of 4,674 worker fatalities in private industry in calendar year 2017, 971 or 20.7% were in construction—that is, one in five worker deaths last year were in construction.” – Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

2 National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2017, published online at https://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/cfoi.pdf
“The transportation and material moving occupational group and the construction and extraction occupational group accounted for 47 percent of worker deaths in 2017. Within the occupational subgroup driver/sales workers and truck drivers, heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers had the largest number of fatal occupational injuries with 840.” – Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor (BLS)

3 National Safety Council Workplace Injuries, published online at https://www.nsc.org/work-safety/tools-resources/infographics/workplace-injuries

“Every 7 seconds, a worker is injured on the job. These numbers are staggering, and the worst part is that each one is preventable.” – National Safety Council (NSC)

4 National Safety Council Work Injury Costs, published online at https://injuryfacts.nsc.org/work/costs/work-injury-costs/

“Cost per ​medically consulted injury​ in 2017 was $39,000, while the cost per death was $1,150,000. These figures include estimates of wage losses, medical expenses, administrative expenses, and employer costs, but excludes property damage costs except to motor vehicles.” – National Safety Council (NSC)

5 2018 Oregon Workers’ Compensation Premium Rate Ranking Summary published online at https://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/reports/Documents/general/prem-sum/18-2082.pdf

According to the 2018 study by the Oregon Department of Business and Consumer Services, the 2018 national median for workers’ comp premium rates is $1.70 per $100 of payroll.

6 2018 Oregon Workers’ Compensation Premium Rate Ranking Summary published online at https://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/reports/Documents/general/prem-sum/18-2082.pdf

A 2018 study by the Oregon Department of Business and Consumer Services ranked workers’ comp premium rates and found that New York has the highest, followed by California and New Jersey. The lowest was in North Dakota.